Jesus, Logic, & the Trivium

John 1:1 - The word became flesh. Popular New Testament passageIn speaking of Jesus, John 1:1 has this to say:

“In the beginning, there was the word [logos], and the word [logos] was with God, and the word [logos] was God”.

Logos is the Greek word for “logic”, but Christian theology has ignored this possible translation from their interpretations of logos, and their understanding of Jesus; that he might have been the embodiment of logical thinking. This verse could very well have been claiming that logic was the firstborn of all creation, that it was with God, and that it was in fact an aspect and revelation of God and Natural Law. Therefore, if this is true, in order to know God, you would have to use logic to align your reality with the Natural Laws of the universe, which is aligning yourself with the truth and the One invisible God.

Logic is the second step of the esoteric method of critical thinking, known as the Trivium; it is the ability to ask “why”, and refine the “why”, until it is fully aligned with the truth. Logic brings clarity to the inputs of reality, also known as data; there is no truth without logic or the ability to ask and refine “why” questions. Try asking “why” questions to an adherent of Christianity, whether it is a follower, teacher, pastor, or theologian, and you may find yourself receiving any number of illogical responses to your well thought out questions (I know, I’ve been there!).

Jesus, the main focal point of Christian religious beliefs, and the person who embodied pure logic and the process of “why” questions and answers, is instead their surrogate to pass off their responsibility for logical thinking, under the guise of “faith“. Logic (logos/Jesus) is the way to claim our personal responsibility, power, and sovereignty; it is the way of truth and of living a moral life, and yes, it is the intermediate (middle) step in the Trivium process of asking “what, why, and how”.  (Note:  while I am critical of Catholic and other Christian dogmas, I am not at all judging those who were programmed to blindly follow such beliefs; they are the product of a deceptive and controlling system that tells them what to believe, rather than allowing for individual expression and thought.  While I am not judgmental of the blind, it is still their responsibility to deprogram their limiting beliefs and misaligned behaviors, and align them with the truth — utilizing logic, so that they might see again.)

When reality is merged with truth, through the refining process of asking “what” and “why” enough times, they merge into a new and higher “how”, as behavior is the product of the “what” and “why” refined together. When we realize that Jesus was an embodiment of the logical processing of experiential input, and the means to refine it into the truth, it brings whole new meaning to the following verse:

“I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

Quite literally, without the ability to ask and receive “why” questions and answers, to filter, discern, and bring clarity to the myriad of data in our world, it is impossible to align with the truth, or ascend to higher realms of consciousness. It is not Jesus the person, but what he represents as the embodiment of logical thinking (asking “why”), that is the way of ascension. In this way, prayer is the process of critical thinking, and of distilling the understanding gained from it into new behaviors and actions that reflect the merging of reality with the truth of God.

Are you bypassing your responsibility to process your reality’s data with logic, and blindly following a pre-programmed path, or are you brave enough to ask “why” as many times as needed to transform your beliefs and behaviors, in order to reflect the One true God? If you are willing to challenge old dogmas, programs, and paradigms with logic [logos], you are indeed a lover of truth — and a follower of Jesus.

See also:

About Nathan & Aline

6 Responses to “Jesus, Logic, & the Trivium”

Read below or add a comment...

Trackbacks

  1. […] Jesus, Logic, & the Trivium […]

  2. […] objective, logical, and process driven, making it an easier yoke to bear. Jesus, also known as the logos, the Greek word for logic, […]

  3. […] For more on this subject, please see the article Jesus, Logic, & the Trivium. […]



Leave A Comment...

*

CommentLuv badge