The Assumption of a Pandemic

The most dangerous ideas in a society are not the ones being argued, but the ones that are assumed. ~C.S. Lewis
In regards to our first worldwide “pandemic”, many are ASSUMING several very big things in their reasoning when they support the official authoritative narrative:
  1. the threat is real, and is caused by what they say it is caused by.
  2. if real and properly identified as the real cause, the threat is as contagious as they say it is, and is spread in the manner they say it is.
  3. if real and properly identified as the real cause, the threat is as deadly as they say it is.
  4. that testing is pointing at the actual cause, and is highly accurate.
  5. the uniform countermeasures and treatments enacted by governments and centralized medical monopolies are scientifically proven as effective against the real cause.
  6. the countermeasures enacted by government are proportionate to the actual threat.
  7. that monopolies such as the government, the CDC, the WHO, the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, etc, are unbiased with nothing to gain financially and/or politically from a pandemic.
  8. actual medicine, such as has been proven to be 90% effective by a French study with hydroxychloroquine, is not being suppressed for financial and/or political reasons.
  9. that the statistics aren’t being manipulated or overstated for financial and/or political gain, and are accurate.
  10. that hospitals treating said patients don’t receive financial incentives for total covid-19 case load, following standardized treatments, and for labeling deaths as a specific cause of death.
As a critical thinking instructor, these are just a few questions that immediately pop into my mind to ask about our core assumptions, but few people are actually asking them. Why are they not being asked?

THE UNITY PROCESS: We’ve created an integrative methodology called the Unity Process, which combines the philosophy of Natural Law, the Trivium Method, Socratic Questioning, Jungian shadow work, and Meridian Tapping—into an easy to use system that allows people to process their emotional upsets, work through trauma, correct poor thinking, discover meaning, set healthy boundaries, refine their viewpoints, and to achieve a positive focus. We practice it together in our groups, and in our individual sessions.

About Nathan Martin